FAQs

iFirst Published: 10 May 2013 Updated: 22 Oct 2018   
Frequently asked questions & answers (Q&A) and facts about the Hove Station Neighbourhood Plan.

Neighbourhood Development Plan (NDP)

What’s Happening Near Me?

There are two ways to find out what developments, workshops and events are happening near you, and how your local area could be improved or affected by the Neighbourhood Plan:

1. browse articles on a map or

2. browse by your local area tag (your piece of the ‘jigsaw’):





 

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What is the City Plan and DA6?

The City Plan Part One is Brighton & Hove Council’s top-level strategic policy framework to guide the new development required across the city – including “Development Area 6 (DA6)”. The first draft of the city plan was the catalyst for Hove residents to respond through the formation of Neighbourhood Plans to the north and south of DA6. 

See B&H City Plan Pt. 1

Brighton City Plan Development Areas

What is a Local Plan?

(AKA local development plan)

Brighton & Hove City Council’s City Plan Part Two is being developed in parallel with the Neighbourhood Plan. 

The role of the City Plan Part Two is to support implementation and delivery; to build on the strategic policy framework; to identify and allocate additional development sites and to set out a detailed development management policy framework to assist in the determination of planning applications.

See B&H City Plan Pt. 2

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What is a community-led Neighbourhood Plan?

neighbourhood-plan-icon

  • The Neighbourhood Plan is a legal document which sits alongside the Council’s City Plan and has to be taken into account by the Local Planning Authority when making decisions on planning applications.
  • It’s purpose is to set out the local people’s vision of the future for their neighbourhood – what residents want their neighbourhood to be like in 5-10-15 years’ time – especially changes which require planning permission.
  • It is also known as a ‘neighbourhood development plan’ or ‘NDP‘.

See our Hove Station Neighbourhood Plan (draft)

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Why does Hove need a community-led neighbourhood plan?

Major developments are happening in the Hove Station area (DA6). This is the result of top-down planning by the city council. In response to this, two Neighbourhood Forums were set up in the Hove area:

1. The Hove Park Forum

2. The Hove Station Forum (what this website is all about)

The Hove Station Forum are producing a two part plan: 1) a set of policies, and  2) a concept plan with community projects.

  • Our Neighbourhood Plan will give local residents and businesses the maximum possible influence:
    • on the type of development,
    • on the local impact – to ensure that it is positive rather than negative.

Read more about the designated neighbourhood boundary here >

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Who’s preparing the Hove Station plan?

forum logo

Neighbourhood plans depend almost entirely on the voluntary resources that a community can muster. Luckily for Hove, a group of experienced local businesses and residents (including architects and planning professionals)  – the Hove Station Neighbourhood Forum (HSNF) – have volunteered to create a Neighbourhood Plan – led by a Management Committee (steering group). This Committee is developing the Plan through a set of Working Groups with responsibilities to tackle the big local issues.

HSNF is formally recognised as the legal body with responsibility for making the plan. It receives limited funding and support from Brighton & Hove City Council and invites co-operation with key local stakeholders: including resident’s associations and community groups.

Organogram: How the Forum Works:

chart

Last updated 18th Feb 2016.  Enlarge >

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How is the Plan being prepared, what are the rules?

Neighbourhood planning can be kept very simple. It is the community’s plan and needs only to deal with the planning issues that matter to us. See the simple guide to writing planning policies ➔.

The Forum has to follow a series of key stages and abide by the following laws (or Basic Conditions):

The Forum management committee also has a number of guiding principles and procedures

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How long does it take to make a Neighbourhood Plan?

HSNF formally started at the end of 2014 and is nearing the end of the process. Find out the current status here. If you’d like to help, please sign up and have your say.

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Do neighbourhood plans have to be evidence based and deliverable?

Yes, neighbourhood plans must have appropriate regard to national policy, including the National Planning Policy Framework and any evidence requirements set out in this. The Hove Station Neighbourhood Forum is abiding by the legal requirements and we are collecting appropriate, proportionate and up-to-date evidence to support our policies.

We’re also reaching out to the community to gather feedback through workshops and Have Your Say Days, and drawing on local research such as Brighton University’s recent study of the Hove station Area

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What Funding, Guidance and Support is available to make a neighbourhood plan?

Guidance

We have a great collection of links to expert resources and support networks

Funding

The Government has allocated over £23m between 2018 – 2022 to support the development of neighbourhood plans or neighbourhood development orders across the UK. We have received technical support from urban design specialists, AECOM to develop a Concept Plan for the Hove Station Quarter.

Our forum spends a lot of time applying for grants and technical support. if you can assist in this process, please let us know.

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Isn’t neighbourhood planning just a tool for those who want to block development?

NIMBY

In a word, no! Neighbourhood planning enables communities to shape the development of their local area in a positive way. With over 260 plans now in force, early findings suggest that when communities get a say over how their area is developed they recognise the benefits that appropriate development can bring.

A community can approve the same or a greater level of development as that already set down by the district or borough council – but they will not be able to approve less development, even if that is a majority view.

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Can a Neighbourhood Plan stop development?

In theory, yes – approved neighbourhood planning documents can play a key role in stopping unwanted development. The documents name sites for housing developments and, if they are approved in a referendum, they become a legally binding element of the council’s planning policy. The council should then be able to reject planning applications for development of sites that aren’t included in the Neighbourhood Plan. However, neighbourhood plans could become automatically invalid if the council cannot prove it has secured enough immediately available housing land to meet the next three years’ demand.

With regards to the City Plan for DA6 (Hove Station area), we believe the area can and should accommodate more new housing than the minimum 650 units proposed in the City Plan. But increased housing must be accompanied by a proportionate increase in the provision of statutory services, particularly education, health and social services, within or close to the redevelopment area.

The Neighbourhood Plan should develop and promote an integrated, rather than a piecemeal, approach to the regeneration of DA6. Thus it should establish an overall spatial development framework which will ensure that each development project contributes in a distinctive and complementary way to the creation of a new Hove Station Urban Quarter.

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Are Neighbourhood Plans worthwhile and effective?

In England, roughly 1,600 groups are currently writing Neighbourhood Plans (NPs), eight million people live in a designated NP area, and that nearly £7m in government grants has been allocated to groups across the country. Academic research also paints a broadly positive picture: A 2014 University of Reading And Locality report states that, overall:

“an initiative with merit and having further potential, although it is not without its challenges”.

“power to the people….the whole exercise brought together the community”

“some plans are openly pro-development, in some cases seeking to extend housing targets and to promote economic growth”.

“there is some hope that NPs can promote an IMBY attitude (In My Back Yard).”

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How many Neighbourhood Plans get voted in / approved?

yes referendum graphicOut of 52 published referendums, the average ‘Yes’ vote was 88%, with an average turnout of 32%, slightly above local election turnouts.

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Can a land owner object at examination if his site is not allocated for development in a neighbourhood plan?

Examinations will be by written representations, examiners will have the ability (indeed will have a duty) to hear oral representations, where necessary, to ensure adequate examination of issues or to ensure a person has a fair chance to put a case.

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Do town councils make the final decision on all new development if they have a neighbourhood plan?

Yes, decision-making on planning applications rests with the Local Planning Authority (LPA). The community leads on preparing the plan and setting out the policies for development in their area but it is the LPA that will grant planning permission in accordance with those policies and be responsible for enforcing them.

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How can good design be made into policy?

A neighbourhood plan enables a community to influence the design and character of future development in the area where they live. This means producing polices which set forth specific design requirements for a neighbourhood area or development site. There are a number of guides available to help, such as:
1) Locality’s Design in Neighbourhood Planning Toolkit,

2) Design Council’s guide to Healthy Placemaking 

3) More resources here…

Hove Park Villas Concept Sketches_TurnerAssociatesTo see how we’re implementing good design into our policies, please see the “Design and public realm” section in the latest Plan Summary Document

Our summary document sets out the vision, followed by objectives and policies. A clear vision determines the strategic objectives, which can be articulated through well designed policies – to ensure the whole is greater than the sum of the parts. Let us know if you think there is scope for further improvement.

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What is a Design Code?

A design code provides detailed design guidance for a site or area; they prescribe design requirements (or ‘rules’) that new development within the specified site or area should follow.

They can include requirements for built form (e.g. setting out a range of building types and how buildings should interact with the street), landscape, open space, and movement (e.g. access and ease of pedestrian movement), etc.

Design codes are useful where there is a desire to:

  • coordinate design outcomes across large or complex sites to deliver a vision that the local community wants to see;
  • ensure consistency across large sites which may be in multiple ownership and/or where development is to be phased and more than one developer and design team is likely to be involved.

You can find more information on design codes within the Planning Practice Guidance at gov.uk

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What is a Concept Plan?

Hove-Station-Concept-Master-Plan-AECOMA concept plan is a flexible plan – drawn up by urban design specialists and the local community – which can under go many changes before becoming a master plan. See our Concept Plan for the Hove Station Quarter, incl. Newtown, Sackville and Conway area. If you are interested in regeneration, and have ideas or expertise with regards to traffic flow, pedestrian access, shared surfaces or landscaping please consider joining the Hove Station Improvement Group

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What is a Master Plan?

A master plan is a detailed long-term planning document which will be executed until the end of a project. It provides a layout to guide future growth and development. Master planning is about making the connection between buildings, social settings, and their surrounding environments. A master plan includes analysis, recommendations, and proposals for a site’s population, economy, housing, transportation, community facilities, and land use. It is based on public input, surveys, planning initiatives, existing development, physical characteristics, and social and economic conditions.

We have a Concept Plan for the Hove Station Quarter which we hope will become a Master Plan.

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Development Area 6 (DA6)

What’s Happening Near Me?

There are two ways to find out what developments, workshops and events are happening near you, and how your local area could be improved or affected by the Neighbourhood Plan:

1. browse articles on a map or

2. browse by your local area tag (your piece of the ‘jigsaw’):





 

Permalink.

What is the City Plan and DA6?

The City Plan Part One is Brighton & Hove Council’s top-level strategic policy framework to guide the new development required across the city – including “Development Area 6 (DA6)”. The first draft of the city plan was the catalyst for Hove residents to respond through the formation of Neighbourhood Plans to the north and south of DA6. 

See B&H City Plan Pt. 1

Brighton City Plan Development Areas

What is a Local Plan?

(AKA local development plan)

Brighton & Hove City Council’s City Plan Part Two is being developed in parallel with the Neighbourhood Plan. 

The role of the City Plan Part Two is to support implementation and delivery; to build on the strategic policy framework; to identify and allocate additional development sites and to set out a detailed development management policy framework to assist in the determination of planning applications.

See B&H City Plan Pt. 2

Permalink.

Why does Hove need a community-led neighbourhood plan?

Major developments are happening in the Hove Station area (DA6). This is the result of top-down planning by the city council. In response to this, two Neighbourhood Forums were set up in the Hove area:

1. The Hove Park Forum

2. The Hove Station Forum (what this website is all about)

The Hove Station Forum are producing a two part plan: 1) a set of policies, and  2) a concept plan with community projects.

  • Our Neighbourhood Plan will give local residents and businesses the maximum possible influence:
    • on the type of development,
    • on the local impact – to ensure that it is positive rather than negative.

Read more about the designated neighbourhood boundary here >

Permalink.

What is a Concept Plan?

Hove-Station-Concept-Master-Plan-AECOMA concept plan is a flexible plan – drawn up by urban design specialists and the local community – which can under go many changes before becoming a master plan. See our Concept Plan for the Hove Station Quarter, incl. Newtown, Sackville and Conway area. If you are interested in regeneration, and have ideas or expertise with regards to traffic flow, pedestrian access, shared surfaces or landscaping please consider joining the Hove Station Improvement Group

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